My Publications

Schinzel, U. (2017). What is Smart Leadership in Luxembourg? In: Vrontis, D., Weber, Y, and Tsoukatos, E. (eds): Conference Proceedings 10th Annual Conference of the EuroMed Academy of Business. Global and national business theories and practice: bridging the past with the future. EuroMed Press, pp. 1579-1611. ISSN: 2547-8516.

 

Schinzel, U. (2017). Responsible and Smart Leadership in Luxembourg? Journal of Advancements in Applied Business Research, Volume VI Number 2, 2017, pp. 5-13. ISSN 2332-0311.

 

Schinzel, U. (2017). Key West 2017 Florida – Sunshine State. In: Reise, reise! Ausflüge – Fahrten – Impressionen. Ausgabe 22. Frieling Verlag Berlin. ISBN 978-3-8280-3344-3.

Schinzel, U. (2017). Three official languages in multicultural Luxembourg. World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, Vol. 13, No. 5/6, pp.471-491. DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2017.10004846

 

Schinzel, U. (2017). Responsible and Smart Leadership in Luxembourg? Journal of Advancements in Applied Business Research, Volume VI Number 2, 2017, pp. 5-13. ISSN 2332-0311. JAABR_Volume_VI_Number_2_2017_ISSN_2332-0311_Schinzel_publication

 

Schinzel, U. (2017). What is Responsible – What is Irresponsible Leadership in Luxembourg? Journal of Strategic and International Studies, Volume XII Number 1, 2017, pp. 12-23. ISSN 2326-3636. JSIS_Volume_XII_Number_1_2017_ISSN_2326-3636_Schinzel_Leadership_publication

 

 

Schinzel, U. (2017). How to Educate Multicultural Managers? The Example of Luxembourg.  in: Rozkwitalska, M., Sulkowski, L. & Magala, S. (Ed) (2016) Intercultural Interactions in the Multicultural Workplace. Springer Verlag. http://www.springer.com/gp/book/9783319397702

 

Schinzel, U. (2016). Expatriates in Luxembourg: How to Cope with Cultural and Linguistic Specificities? Journal of Business and Economics, Vol. 7, Nr. 1, January 2016. NY: New York. ISSN 2155-7950. DOI:10.15341/jbe(2155-7950)/01.07.2015/005 JBE 2016-1_Expatriates_in_Luxembourg

 

Elenkov, D., and Schinzel, U. (2016). 2016 ACADEMIC OASIS/ IAABR – MIAMI BEACH INTERNATIONAL ACADEMIC CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS. 2016 MIAMI BEACH CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS

 

Schinzel, U. (2015). Impact of National Culture on e-Recruitment Practices in Luxembourg. World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, Vol. X, Nos. Y, pp.xxx-xxx. DOI: 10.xxxx/WREMSD.xxxxxxx (UPCOMING)

 

Schinzel, U. (2015). An analysis of cultural shifts – the examples of Luxembourg, France, Germany. World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, Vol. 11, Nos. 2/3, pp.308–326. DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068586

 

Schinzel, U. (2015). Expat Destination Luxembourg: Hell Or Paradise?. Journal of Strategic and International Studies, Volume X Number 6, 2015, pp. 32-42. ISSN 2326-3636.  JSIS_2015_Vol_X_Nr_6_Schinzel_Expat_Destination_Luxembourg_Hell_or_Paradise

Schinzel, U. (2015). Educating Tri-Cultural Managers in Luxembourg. Journal of Psychology and Social Studies, Vol IX Number 5, pp.23-31, 20015. ISSN 2327-7017.  JPSS_2015_Vol_IX_Nr_5_Schinzel_Educating_Tri-Cultural_Managers_in_Luxembourg

 

Sharp, P., and Schinzel, U. (2015). Innovative Use of Knowledge for Personal Development. Journal of Strategic and International Studies, Volume X Number 3, 2015, pp. 32-42. ISSN 2326-3636. JSIS_2015_Vol_X_Nr_3_Sparp_Schinzel_Innovative_Use_of_Knowledge_for_Personal_Development

 

Schinzel, U. (2015). Why Networks Are Beneficial for Micro-Foundations in Cross-Cultural Environments. Journal of Strategic and International Studies, Volume X Number 2, 2015. ISSN 2326-3636.  JSIS_2015_Vol_X_Nr_2_Schinzel_Why_Networks_Are_Beneficial_For_Micro_Foundations

 

Schinzel, U. (2015). E-Recruitment in Luxembourg? Journal of Strategic and International Studies, Volume X Number 1, 2015. ISSN 2326-3636.   JSIS_2015_Vol_X_Nr_1_Schinzel_e-Recruitment_in_Luxembourg

 

Schinzel, U. (2014). Multinational – multicultural – multilingual Luxembourg – a system of integration – or – a system of failure? Journal of Strategic and International Studies, Volume IX Number 6, 2014. ISSN 2326-3636.   JSIS_2014_Vol_IX_Nr_6_Schinzel_Multilingual_Luxembourg_Integration_or_Failure

 

Schinzel, U. (2014). Hofstede in Luxembourg. Intercultural comparison of Luxembourg-France-Germany. Journal of Strategic and International Studies, Volume IX Number 6, 2014. ISSN 2326-3636.   JSIS_2014_Vol_IX_Nr_6_Schinzel_Hofstede_in_Luxembouerg_Intercultural_Comparison_F_G_L

 

Schinzel, U. (2015). Multilingual or failed? Is the Trilingual Luxembourgish Public Education System a Failure or a Success Story? Journal of Business and Economics, Vol. 6, Nr. 3, March 2015. NY: New York. ISSN 2155-7950. DOI:10.15341/jbe(2155-7950)/03.06.2015/016; http://www.academicstar.us/issuelist.asp?ArtID=371&issid=485; http://www.academicstar.us/issueshow.asp?daid=1130

 

Schinzel, U. (2015). Hofstede in Luxembourg. Journal of Business and Economics, Vol. 6, Nr. 2, February 2015. NY: New York. ISSN 2155-7950. DOI:10.15341/jbe(2155-7950)/02.06.2015/012; http://www.academicstar.us/issuelist.asp?ArtID=371&issid=486;
http://www.academicstar.us/issueshow.asp?daid=1109

 

Schinzel, U. (2015). It’s the Network, stupid. Journal of Business and Economics, Vol. 6, Nr. 1, January 2015. NY: New York. ISSN 2155-7950. DOI:10.15341/jbe(2155-7950)/01.06.2015/014; http://www.academicstar.us/issuelist.asp?ArtID=371&issid=487; http://www.academicstar.us/issueshow.asp?daid=1089

 

Schinzel, U. (2014). Who wants digital HRM? Journal of Business and Economics, Vol. 5, Nr. 12, December 2014, pp. 2374-2390. NY: New York, USA. ISSN 2155-7950. DOI:10.15341/jbe(2155-7950)/12.05.2014/018; http://www.academicstar.us/issuelist.asp?ArtID=371&issid=421; http://www.academicstar.us/issueshow.asp?daid=1065

 

Schinzel, U. (2015). India is Market – Fascinating India, in : Reise, reise! Ausflüge – Fahrten – Impressionen. Frieling-Verlag. 2015. ISBN 978-3-8280-3286-6.

 

Schinzel, U. (2014). Quelles compétences à l’international – Luxembourg, France, Allemagne. Frieling-Verlag. May 2014. ISBN 978-3-8280-3217-0.

 

Schinzel, U. (2013). How to get a Doctorate – and more – with Distance Learning/Online. – Frieling-Verlag. March 2013. ISBN 978-3-8280-3128-9.

 

Schinzel, U. (2013). Why are People in Luxembourg Happy? Language as an Identifier of Culture in the Grand Duchy. Journal of Customer Behaviour, Vol. 12, Nr. 4, pp. 315-340. ISSN 1475-3928. JCB-Schinzel-authorcopy

 

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http://econpapers.repec.org/article/idswremsd/

http://econpapers.repec.org/article/idswremsd/v_3a11_3ay_3a2015_3ai_3a2_2f3_3ap_3a308-326.htm

http://www.inderscience.com/offer.php?id=68586

World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development

2015 Vol. 11 No. 2/3

Special Issue on Entrepreneurship and Management Answers to Selected Interdisciplinary Topics in Difficult Times

Guest Editors: Dr. Ursula Schinzel and Dr. Amiram Porath

Editorial
Pages Title and authors
129-136 Political and military action frame of the European Union in crises management
Corneliu Balta; Gheorghe Bica; Diana Nicoleta Rosioru
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068574
137-155 Stimulating entrepreneurship by teaching accounting: concept and implementation
Anna Białek-Jaworska; Renata Gabryelczyk
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068575
156-171 Innovation and knowledge management in a knowledge-based economy 
Gheorghe Bică; Mădălina Constantinescu; Elena Bică
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068576
172-185 Emerging from crisis with new approaches to science of society
Aurelian Bondrea; Larisa Mihoreanu; Carmen Costea; Adrian Vasile
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068577
186-199 An exploratory investigation on new product development in family luxury businesses
Stefano Bresciani; Bernardo Bertoldi; Chiara Giachino; Alberto Ferraris
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068578
200-216 Strategic R&D internationalisation in developing Asian countries – the Italian experience
Stefano Bresciani; Alkis Thrassou; Demetris Vrontis
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068579
217-231 Consequences of investment contract duration on the valuation of firms in maturity stage
Madalena Delgado; Renato Pereira; Álvaro Dias
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068580
232-246 Knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship and performance during the crisis: cases of the Greek wood industry
Glykeria Karagouni
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068581
247-266 A quality management model for integrated healthcare in Poland
Iga Rudawska; Hans Ruediger Kaufmann
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068582
267-281 Monetary and financial policies: a dynamical model approach
Ion Viorel Matei; Laura Ungureanu; Eduard Ionescu
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068583
282-295 Analysing wellbeing at the crossroads of socioeconomic growth and business ethics
Larisa Mihoreanu; Laura Oana Goran; Tania Georgia Viciu
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068584
296-307 Different approaches to technology transfer by government and academy
Amiram Porath; Isabel Ramos; Hakikur Rahman
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068585
308-326 An analysis of cultural shifts – the examples of Luxembourg, France, Germany
Ursula Schinzel
DOI: 10.1504/WREMSD.2015.068586

World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sust. Development, Vol. 11, Nos. 2/3, 2015 125 Copyright © 2015 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.
Editorial Ursula Schinzel* 22, Rue Adolphe Fischer, L-1520 Luxembourg, Luxembourg Email: ursula_schinzel@yahoo.com *Corresponding author
Amiram Porath 18 Ela Street, Bat-Hefer 4284200, Israel Email: amirampster@gmail.com
The call for papers for this guest edition allowed the collection of papers from a very diverse range of salient entrepreneurial and managerial topics in economic difficult times in the beginning of the 21st century. The global challenges for entrepreneurs and management alike are triggered by increased levels of globalisation, internationalisation or cross-cultural issues. This calls for effective entrepreneurial, managerial and societal crisis management implying paradigm changes in strategy, marketing and e-marketing, human resources, quality management or knowledge transfer. Solutions require adequate learning and training facilities with new pedagogic concepts as well as selected political and social solutions reflecting comprehensive approaches to emerging crises, which are provided by this guest edition. Furthermore, innovative concepts and methods to stimulate entrepreneurship, aiming to contribute to increased levels of wellbeing, quality, and sustainability, and last but not least to financial security. The papers’ research settings are located in different European and associated countries and cover topics which are perceived to be currently under-researched: healthcare in Poland, online laboratory for learning accounting in Poland, family luxury businesses in Italy, the Greek wood and furniture sector, wellbeing at the crossroads of socio-economic growth, technology transfer models in Israel and Portugal, cultural shifts in Luxembourg. Reflecting the holistic character of the guest edition, solutions are also suggested for crisis management in the European Union, including political and military actions. As to methodological aspects, the guest edition embraces papers that are empirically, conceptually or case study based, representing an interesting mixture intended to bring topics to discussion rather than to conclusions. The diversified nature of this contextual mixture is intended to reflect the diversified nature of challenges of the European entrepreneurial and management arena calling for concerted actions. The topics mentioned above cover sectors from low-tech to high tech, from public research organisations to commercial firms covering the diversified cultural and geographical scenes in the EU. The following briefly introduces the respective papers’ contents: (U. Schinzel and A. Porath )
• ‘Political and military action frame of the European Union in crises management’ by Corneliu Balta, Gheorghe Bica and Diana Nicoleta Rosioru
This study researches the European Union (EU), who is one of the dynamic non-state players on the world scene in relation to the crises and conflict management. As a result, it activates by voluntary conjecture of a hefty assortment of political and military roles for preventing and resolving the predicaments and clashes, which can come about in the European space or adjoining its strategic neighbourhood.
• ‘Stimulating entrepreneurship by teaching accounting: concept and implementation’ by Anna Białek-Jaworska and Renata Gabryelczyk
This study aims to present an idea for the implementation of an educational programme to usher students towards entrepreneurship through an integrated process approach, illustrating business operations with real accounting documents and bookkeeping, using ERP and IT modelling and process analysis tools. The proposed approach will enable students to develop an understanding of the business environment and allow them to obtain some practical experience in accounting.
• ‘Innovation and knowledge management in a knowledge-based economy’ by Gheorghe Bică, Mădălina Constantinescu and Elena Bică
The main objective of this research is to provide a comprehensive view of the current state of research and practices regarding the development of the knowledge-based economy: innovation as a key driver in wealth creation; how to maximise creativity and innovation in any individual, organisation, region or economy. Another objective of the paper addresses the context of how information technology (IT) can aid the transformation process of knowledge.
• ‘Emerging from crisis with new approaches to science of society’ by Aurelian Bondrea, Larisa Mihoreanu, Carmen Costea and Adrian Vasile
The study of complex systems, evolutionary economics and interdisciplinary research offers the possibility of new developments. The recurrence of economic crises serves to illustrate the limits of neoclassical economics and the contemporary established models. Modern-day economic developments are highly influenced by the theory of complexity. Complex systems research represents the viable alternative for sustainable growth in the following decades. The concept of emergence represents an insightful argument against the well-planned and ordered nature of the social sciences universe.
• ‘An exploratory investigation on new product development in family luxury businesses’ by Stefano Bresciani, Bernardo Bertoldi, Chiara Giachino and Alberto Ferraris
This research aims at investigating the relationship between family and products in the luxury sector, in order to understand if and how, the family affects the success of the company. 19 family businesses were interviewed, operating in the luxury sector discovering that the involvement of the family and its essence are deeply anchored in the core business of the company. Firms need to quickly and timely anticipate competitors’ next moves, monitor market tastes, adapt their products and properly communicate their positioning. Products often remain faithful to the style impressed by the family.
• ‘Strategic R&D internationalisation in developing Asian countries – the Italian experience’ by Stefano Bresciani, Alkis Thrassou and Demetris Vrontis
The aim of this paper is to show R&D internationalisation activities of firms from Italy in Asian developing countries. Using a dataset of 500 Italian firms with international R&D units, as well as interviews, it was researched whether companies follow a knowledge augmenting or knowledge sourcing strategy. The results show a positive relation between the choice to settle R&D units in Asia and the sale of innovative products in Asia, concluding that firms follow a knowledge exploiting strategy, establishing their whole innovation value chain to developing Asian countries.
• ‘Consequences of investment contract duration on the valuation of firms in maturity stage’ by Madalena Delgado, Renato Pereira and Álvaro Dias
Variables influencing investment contract duration were studied by investigating the performance of mature Portuguese firms that have been (partially) held by venture capital funds. Evidence was found that sales growth, exports, book value, headcount and a good coverage of ISO standards implementation influenced the investment contract duration.
• ‘Knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship and performance during the crisis: cases of the Greek wood industry’ by Glykeria Karagouni
The study approaches the relationship between knowledge-intensive entrepreneurship (KIE) in low-tech, traditional sectors and environmental instability from the perspective of the long severe financial crisis in Greece, of the wood industry in Greece, which led to a drastic economic downturn.
• ‘A quality management model for integrated healthcare in Poland’ by Iga Rudawska and Hans Ruediger Kaufmann
The objective of this paper is to identify the indicators of a quality management model for integrated healthcare settings in Poland. In order to elicit the items and clusters of quality management, a three-step methodology has been applied: a literature review, a Delphi study, and concept mapping.
• ‘Monetary and financial policies: a dynamical model approach’ by Ion Viorel Matei, Laura Ungureanu and Eduard Ionescu
This study presents a dynamic model for monetary policy. The model emphasises both the principal interdependence settled between system variables (real stock of money, rate of inflation) and the variation of these in relation to the parameters values.
• ‘Analysing wellbeing at the crossroads of socioeconomic growth and business ethics’ by Larisa Mihoreanu, Laura Oana Goran and Tania Georgia Viciu
The study tries to enquire the characteristics of individual and national wellbeing towards both the role and effects of corruption as corrosion element, to determine the manner in which these influence each other, and how they impact decisions of business planners and policymakers. 128 U. Schinzel and A. Porath
• ‘Different approaches to technology transfer by government and academy’ by Amiram Porath, Isabel Ramos and Hakikur Rahman The paper presents the conflict between the natural preference of technology transfer organisations (TTO) regarding commercialisation for the licensing option and the government preference for spin-offs.
• ‘An analysis of cultural shifts – the examples of Luxembourg, France, Germany’ by Ursula Schinzel
The purpose of this research is to investigate the cultural shifts in Hofstede’s cultural dimensions Individualism, Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, Masculinity, Long-Term Orientation, Indulgence versus Restraint, and Monumentalism in Luxembourg, France and Germany.
Summarising, this guest edition is an eclectic collection of papers treating current diverse entrepreneurial and management challenges and opportunities. We, the guest authors, wish you interesting reading.

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My Publications in: Journal of Strategic and International Studies

Volume IX Number 6 2014 ISSN2326-3636

see here: JSIS_MANILA_Online_November_2014_my_2_publications

Volume X Number 2 2015 ISSN2326-3636

see here: JSIS_KEY_WEST_Volume_X_Number_2_2015_ISSN_2326-3636_Schinzel_1_publication

Volume X Number 1 2015 ISSN2326-3636

see here: JSIS__Miami_Volume_X_Number_1_2015_Schinzel_1_publication

click also on:

http://www.academia.edu/10677024/Journal_of_Strategic_and_International_Studies

 

Volume IX Number 6 2014 ISSN2326-3636

see here: JSIS_ORLANDO_Volume_IX_Number_6_November_2014_ISSN_2326-3636_Schinzel_2_publications – Copy

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JBE_front_page

My Publications in: Journal of Business and Economics

see here my publications:

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1) “Who wants digital HRM? The example of Luxembourg”

Volume 5, Number 12, December 2014:

DOI:10.15341/jbe(2155-7950)/12.05.2014/018

http://www.academicstar.us/issuelist.asp?ArtID=371&issid=421

http://www.academicstar.us/issueshow.asp?daid=1065

ABSTRACT

Who Wants Digital HRM? The Example of Luxembourg

Ursula Schinzel
(United Business Institute, L-1520, Luxembourg)
Abstract: Purpose: This research asks the questions “who wants digital HRM?” or “do we really want digital HRM?” with the example of Luxembourg who goes against the current trend of going digital. It investigates the cultural and linguistic characteristics of Luxembourg that may influence the tendency of human resources specialists in Luxembourg to be reluctant towards digital social networking technologies such as LinkedIn, Viadeo, Xing, Facebook and Twitter. Design: Interviews, questionnaires and case studies are used in 31 companies in Luxembourg. The author explores the extent of the use of new social networking technologies in Luxembourg. She looks at the specific political, economic and historical context of Luxembourg that impact the use of social networking platforms in the management of HR. Findings: The reluctance to use social networking technologies is related to Luxembourg’s high score on Hofstede’s “Uncertainty Avoidance”. Luxembourgish language is used as an identifier in the Grand Duchy, might represent an impediment to the extent of adoption and use of digital social networking technologies. Research limitations: The comparatively small sample size constitutes a factor that threatens the generalisation of the findings. Practical implications: Practical advice is offered to HR managers wishing to be successful in Luxembourg. Originality: The research is about new social technologies and e-HR. It tries an answer to the question, why HR specialists in Luxembourg have been reluctant to utilise new social networking technologies, considering the special cultural pattern following Hofstede.
Key words: international entrepreneurship; digital HRM; digital social networking; cross-cultural
management; Hofstede’s cultural dimensions; Luxembourg
JEL codes: F

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2)”It’s the network – stupid!”

Volume 6, Number 1, January 2015

DOI:10.15341/jbe(2155-7950)/01.06.2015/014

http://www.academicstar.us/issuelist.asp?ArtID=371&issid=487

http://www.academicstar.us/issueshow.asp?daid=1089

ABSTRACT

It’s the Network—Stupid!

Ursula Schinzel
(United Business Institute Luxembourg)
Abstract: This research, based on Nahapiet and Ghoshal (1998), investigates why networks, a shared language and storytelling help organizational advantage in microfoundations in international environments, especially in Strategic Human Resource Management (SHRM). The first part of this paper is dedicated to an in-depth literature review. In the second part, the research method is explained: survey questionnaires were developed based on Nahapiet and Ghoshal (1998), translated from English to French and German and distributed. The questionnaire consisted of 28 closed questions on a five-point Likert scale and two open questions regarding networks in person or digital networks, producing many direct quotes from the respondents. A total of 253 questionnaires were collected, out of which 246 were usable. One interview was conducted for the purpose of this research, with the objective to validate the results from the questionnaires, but it was not included into this paper. Further research could focus on qualitative research methods, as well as the influence of new media and age. In the third part, the findings of this research are presented: Networks provide access to information, are easily accessible, flexible and efficient, diverse, they are fast, cheap, “Who you know” determines “What you know”, there are obligations, norms, and expectations within a network, and there are issues with trust and confidentiality in networks. Some HR managers have a preference for networks in person compared to digital networks; their respective arguments are presented. A shared language is used as identifier as it defines the in-group and distinguishes from the out-group, is important in social relations, enables people to discuss and exchange information, to ask questions, to conduct business, creates group-specific communication codes, enables the combining of information, the development of new concepts and the creation of new knowledge, and influences our perception. If people do not speak the language, they are kept apart and have restricted or no access to
information. Storytelling is used to show and transmit values, norms, and culture, to share knowledge and understanding, it is useful in education and training, it helps to communicate quickly, naturally, clearly; with storytelling one can focus on a vision and plan the future, solve problems and conflicts, inspire continuous innovation, manage change, and make decisions. It is proposed that networking, in person and in digital form, a shared language as identifier and storytelling are capabilities for shaping the future and success of microfoundations in international environments. Conclusion and discussion, limitations, further research, and references follow.
Key words: Strategic Human Resource Management (SHRM); networks; storytelling; language as identifier;
international entrepreneurship; microfoundations
JEL codes: F

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3) “Hofstede in Luxembourg”

Volume 6, Number 2, February 2015

DOI:10.15341/jbe(2155-7950)/02.06.2015/012

http://www.academicstar.us/issuelist.asp?ArtID=371&issid=486

http://www.academicstar.us/issueshow.asp?daid=1109

ABSTRACT

Hofstede in Luxembourg

Ursula Schinzel
(United Business Institute, Luxembourg)
Abstract: The purpose of this research is to find out where Luxembourg fits in on Hofstede’s cultural dimensions — Individualism, Power Distance, Uncertainty Avoidance, Masculinity, Long-Term Orientation, Indulgence, and Monumentalism — in comparison with France and Germany. The design of the research is the replication of Hofstede’s study by using Hofstede’s methods: participant observation, interviews and original questionnaire, the values survey module VSM 2008 (Hofstede, 2008). Three hypotheses are offered. This is the first time Hofstede’s studies are replicated entirely in Luxembourg, providing 134 filled-in questionnaires and a full set of results for Hofstede’s cultural dimensions. The originality of this research lies in the separation into Lux.Nat. (Luxembourg with Luxembourgish nationality) and Luxembourg (including the foreigners), and the data found for Monumentalism. Implications of culture on practices, discussion and implications, future research and references follow.
Key words: international management; Hofstede; cultural dimensions; intercultural comparison; language as
identifier; Luxembourg
JEL code: F

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4) “Multilingual or failed? Is the Trilingual Luxembourgish Public Education System a Failure or a Success Story?”

Volume 6, Number 3, March 2015

DOI:10.15341/jbe(2155-7950)/03.06.2015/016

http://www.academicstar.us/issuelist.asp?ArtID=371&issid=485

http://www.academicstar.us/issueshow.asp?daid=1130

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Multilingual or Failed? Is the Trilingual Luxembourgish Public Education
System a Failure or a Success Story?

ABSTRACT

Ursula Schinzel
(United Business Institute, Luxembourg)

 

Abstract: The purpose of this study is to describe and explain the Luxembourgish trilingual public education system and, consequently, to determine whether the Luxembourgish trilingual public education system is a system of success or of failure. The aim is to determine whether people in Luxembourg and the rest of the world have a positive or negative opinion towards the trilingual public education system in place, or if they rather would prefer a bilingual public education system, or any other combination of languages of instruction in education. 154 questionnaires were collected and 36 interviews conducted among (1) Luxembourgers with Luxembourgish Nationality (Lux.Nat.), (2) Luxembourg residents including Lux.Nat. and foreigners who reside in Luxembourg (Lux.All.), and (3) the rest of the world (World). More specifically cross-cultural management theories by Hofstede et al. (2010), Hofstede (2001) and House et al. (2004), in combination with language theories by Lewis (2006), Blackledge and Ceese (2010), (Cummins (2000), García (2014, 2009), and language and management theories by Brannen, Piekkari & Tietze (2014) serve as basis for the language as identifier theory (Schinzel, 2013a). There is a high failure rate of school students who tend to not understand the language of instruction especially in mathematics, biology, chemistry, and history, and the command of the English language in schools is insufficient. The results indicate that most respondents prefer integration not separation of the population, the system should maintain its instruction in the three official languages of the country: Luxembourgish, French, German. Residents should adopt a geocentric approach residing in a multilingual and multicultural reality in Luxembourg. Some of the interviews are reprinted; discussion, implications, and recommendations for future research follow.
Key words: language and management; Hofstede, education; cross-cultural management; international
business; language; trilingual public education system; Luxembourg
JEL code: F

Multilingual or Failed by Dr Ursula Schinzel

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JBE_Vol.1_Nr1_January2015_Ursula_Schinzel

JBE 2015-2

JBE_2014_12

JBE 2015-3

Multilingual or Failed by Dr Ursula Schinzel

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I published in Journal of Customer Behaviour

see here: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/westburn/jcb/2013/00000012/00000004/art00004?crawler=true

Journal of Customer Behaviour, Volume 12, Number 4, Winter 2013 , pp. 315-340(26)

Why are people in Luxembourg happy? An exploratory study of happiness and culture measured by the dimension of a language as identifier in the Grand Duchy

Author: Schinzel, Ursula

Source: Journal of Customer Behaviour, Volume 12, Number 4, Winter 2013 , pp. 315-340(26)

Publisher: Westburn Publishers Ltd

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Abstract:

The purpose of this study is to explain Luxembourg people’s high scores on the measure of happiness by looking into the relationship between happiness and culture, as measured by the command of a language. More specifically, Hofstede’s dimensions of culture, ‘Individualism/Collectivism’, ‘Power Distance’, ‘Masculinity/Femininity’, ‘Uncertainty Avoidance’, ‘Long-Term Orientation/Short-Term Orientation’, ‘Indulgence versus Restraint’ and ‘Monumentalism’, as well as ‘Happiness’, (Diener & Lucas, 2000) are measured and calculated by obtaining responses from 134 employees who work at Lindab Buildings in Luxembourg, France and Germany. No significant differences were found between Hofstede’s estimates for the dimensions of culture in Luxembourg and his scores for Germany, and the current study’s results for Lindab in Luxembourg and Germany. Differences were found between Hofstede’s and Lindab results for France and for Luxembourgers who command the Luxembourgish language, indicating that language is an identifier of culture. Pearson Correlations were calculated, where Happiness was found to be related to Indulgence and to Long-Term Orientation. Discussion, implications, limitations, and future research suggestions follow.

Keywords: CROSS-CULTURAL MANAGEMENTDIMENSIONS OF CULTUREHAPPINESSLANGUAGELUXEMBOURG;VALUES

Document Type: Research Article

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1362/147539213X13875568505822

Publication date: December 1, 2013

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http://www.frieling.de/unsere-autoren/archive/ursula-schinzel/?searchterm=schinzel*

Die großen Themen unserer Zeit (2014)

Autoren im Dialog. Mit Beiträgen zum Schwerpunktthema „Ist die Humanität am Ende?“

Der lebendige Austausch über gesellschaftlich und politisch rele­vante Themen ist für eine Demokratie maßgebend. Deshalb liegt dem Frieling-Verlag Berlin ein offener und engagierter Dialog zu den richtungsweisenden Themen unserer Zeit am Herzen. In dem kritischen Sammelband Die großen Themen unserer Zeit • Autoren im Dia­log bekennen Autorinnen und Autoren politisch Farbe, beziehen zu aktuellen Fragen Stellung und prangern gesellschaftliche Missstände an. Dabei werden bewusst auch kontroverse Sichtweisen veröffentlicht.

Der erste Teil des vorliegenden Bandes umfasst Beiträge zum Schwerpunktthema „Ist die Humanität am Ende?“ In diesem Thementeil setzen sich Autorinnen und Autoren auf formal und inhaltlich vielfältige Art mit den Grundlagen unserer Gesellschaft und unserer Menschlichkeit auseinander. Sie berichten von eigenen Erlebnissen und Erfahrungen als Helfende in unterschiedlichen Situationen, beleuchten die Situation in fernen Ländern und erörtern die philosophischen, sozialen und religiösen Aspekte der Hinwendung zum Mitmenschen. Dem schließen sich im zweiten Teil Beiträge zu weiteren gesellschaftlich relevanten Themen an. So bietet der Band einen facettenreichen Blick auf den Zustand der Welt, in der wir leben.

Johann-Friedrich Huffmann (Hrsg.):
Die großen Themen unserer Zeit (2014)
Autoren im Dialog. Mit Beiträgen zum Schwerpunktthema „Ist die Humanität am Ende?“
Reihe: Anthologien
192 Seiten, Taschenbuch (Paperback)
EUR 10,00 · ISBN 978-3-8280-3229-3

http://www.frieling.de/unsere-autoren/archive/ursula-schinzel

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Ursula Schinzel

Ursula Schinzel, Doctorate in Business Administration, studied international business, management, human resources and economics in London (UK), Paris (France), Saarbrücken (Germany) and in the USA. Since nearly 20 years she held different positions in leading American and European multinational corporations in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. For the last 30 years she has been sports instructor with several sport clubs and since 20 years with Sports pour Tous, Ville de Luxembourg.

Dr Ursula Schinzel publishes articles and books and delivers lectures at conferences in German, English, French, Italian and Luxembourgish.

Publikationen von Ursula Schinzel:

 

How to get a Doctorate – and more

A personal and private guide for both students and supervisors

Ursula Schinzel hat sich mit 45 Jahren dazu entschlossen, ihren Doktortitel in Business Administration zu machen und gibt hier ihre wertvollen Erfahrungen wieder. Auf dem Weg dorthin ist einiges zu beachten: die Wahl der Institution, die Bewerbung um den Doktorandenplatz, die Sprachprüfungen IELTS (International English Language Testing System) und TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) für Nicht-Muttersprachler, das Formulieren der Forschungsfrage sowie die Datenzusammenstellung durch Teilnehmerbeobachtungen.
Die Autorin erläutert das Vorgehen bei der Datenanalyse mit der Statistiksoftware SPSS und die Anwendung von APA, eine Richtlinie zum Veröffentlichen wissenschaftlicher Texte. Hinweise, wie man seine mündliche Prüfung besteht und sich schließlich für einen akademischen Job bewirbt, gibt sie ebenso.

Ursula Schinzel liefert eine beeindruckende Zusammenfassung ihrer eigenen Doktorarbeit, in der sie das kulturelle Muster Luxemburgs im Vergleich zu Frankreich und Deutschland untersucht hat. Dies geschah in Zusammenarbeit mit dem internationalen Konzern Lindab Buildings, der Produkte und Systemlösungen aus Stahl für vereinfachtes Bauen und für verbessertes Innenraumklima produziert und vermarktet. Sie bediente sich der fünf Kulturdimensionen des niederländischen Experten für Kulturwissenschaften Geert Hofstede: Machtdistanz, Individualismus und Kollektivismus, Maskulinität versus Femininität, Unsicherheitsvermeidung, Lang- oder kurzfristige Ausrichtung. Fragebögen auf Englisch, Französisch, Deutsch und Türkisch sind am Ende des Buches zu finden.

Ursula Schinzel:
How to get a Doctorate – and more
A personal and private guide for both students and supervisors
Reihe: Ratgeber
144 Seiten, Taschenbuch (Paperback)
EUR 13,90 · ISBN 978-3-8280-3128-9

 

Quelles compétences pour réussir à l’international ? – ou – Pourquoi les luxembourgeois sont-ils heureux ?

Comparaison interculturelle Luxembourg–France–Allemagne

Ce livre essaie de donner une réponse à la question: Quelles compétences pour réussir à l’international ?

Il apporte un regard nouveau sur la comparaison interculturelle, initiée par Geert Hofstede, tout en la liant à l’étude sur le bonheur. La langue est vue comme identifiant au management international à travers les dimensions culturelles de Geert Hofstede. L’impact des différences culturelles sur les rencontres interculturelles est étudié. Une revue de la littérature met en valeur les recherches en matière de comparaison interculturelle Luxembourg-France-Allemagne. Les anecdotes, parfois amusantes, citées – qui pourront vous donner une impression de déjà-vu – vous montreront les implications de la recherche interculturelle sur vos décisions présentes et à venir.
À l‘instar de Hofstede, on peut dire que l’identification se fait grâce à plusieurs facteurs: langue, personnalité, tenue vestimentaire, coiffure, amis, monde du travail, programmations mentales, etc. Dans la vie courante, la langue et la culture influencent nos décisions à chaque instant, consciemment mais surtout inconsciemment.

Pour clôturer ce livre, l’auteur essaie, en plus, de trouver une réponse à la question: « Pourquoi les luxembourgeois sont-ils heureux ? »

Ursula Schinzel:
Quelles compétences pour réussir à l’international ? – ou – Pourquoi les luxembourgeois sont-ils heureux ?
Comparaison interculturelle Luxembourg–France–Allemagne
Reihe: Politik und Gesellschaft
164 Seiten, Taschenbuch (Paperback)
EUR 17,90 · ISBN 978-3-8280-3217-0

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